6 Reasons Your v**ina Hurts

6 Reasons Your v**ina Hurts



There’s the kind of down-there pain that follows over-zealous s*x—but then there are other types that are a bit more serious. And unlike diagnosing, say, high cholesterol, identifying what’s causing your hoo-ha to hurt isn’t always easy. Here are six of the most common causes of below-the-belt pain—and what to do if you experience these symptoms.

1.  Herpes
No one wants to believe they’ve contracted an STI, but Visible blisters and intense pain accompany STD. If you spot a bump or blister down below that doesn’t belong, contact your ob-gyn immediately. While there’s no cure for herpes, your doctor can start you on medications that will reduce your frequency of outbreaks and help you manage your pain.

2. Yeast Infections
While these don’t usually give you pain, per se, they can make you feel dry and itchy in the v**ina, which some people will interpret as pain, Chances are good—three in four, in fact—that you’ll experience a yeast infection in your lifetime. While you can treat a yeast infection with OTC medications (and may choose to if you’ve experienced this type of infection before), it’s best to seek a doctor’s opinion if this is your first time dealing with the condition. Your ob-gyn will perform a pelvic exam and prescribe you an anti-fungal cream to use until your symptoms are gone.

3. Vaginal Dryness
You may think this is only a problem for post-menopausal women, but you’d be wrong. Thanks to low-estrogen birth control pills, many young women experience vaginal dryness, too, which can make s*x uncomfortable and even painful. Estrogen is a moisturizer, So if a birth control pill is low in estrogen, your v**ina’s moisture will also be low.

4. His man-hood
While you may be inclined to blame your own anatomy, we encourage you to look at your partner, too. Is it really pain in your v**ina that you’re experiencing, or is it pain during penetration—something you feel inside your belly?. It can be very hard to differentiate. Larger men can be difficult to take in—and it may be time to switch positions to something more comfortable.

5.  Endometriosis or Pelvic Inflammatory Disease
If you have pain during penetration and your period, your symptoms may be pointing you toward endometriosis (when the tissue that lines your uterus grows in other spots) or pelvic inflammatory disease (an infection of the female reproductive organs). After a pelvic exam and ultrasound to determine whether you’re suffering from one of these conditions, your doctor will likely put you on a course of painkillers and hormone therapy.

6. Vulvodynia
About nine percent of women will have this kind of pain in their lives. the discomfort occurs during penetration or even when you’re inserting a tampon. For some women, pings of pain are spontaneous and unrelated to s*x or touching the area in any way.




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