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Caster Semenya Made To Walk Into A Dressing Room N*ked To Prove She’s A Woman – Lifestyle News


Growing as a child, Olympic champion Caster Semenya at some stage had to walk into a change room naked just to prove that she was a girl as her teammates struggled to compete with her, according to a report by SowetanTimes.

Speaking at the Standard Bank Top Women Conference held at Emperors Palace in Kempton Park on the East Rand, Semenya said her humbled beginnings made her the tough woman she had become. She said she grew up around boys and had to walk seven miles every single day – the reason she is fast.

“I was always in the bush [training]. Bullies for me never existed because how I responded to them, was way rough. I was one of those young [ladies] that had no fear. I had goals. I knew that everything I touched would turn to gold,” she said.

With a mother who .ed netball and a father who was a soccer .er, being in sport was a foregone conclusion. Semenya started .ing soccer at the age of four and she was described as a “diski queen”.

“My dad thought I was going to be with Banyana Banyana but I disappointed him because I had to sell my soccer boots for spikes instead. He was quite surprised. Running is my destiny. When I’m on track, I forget about everything,” she said.

Semenya said she had always had to compete with older children when running as those her age could simply not match her talent. To run even faster, Semenya then trained in the sand so that she could not be matched on tracks.

“I think my parents raised me well. They have never questioned what I do, my feelings, how I see life. They accepted me for who I am. They could see that this one was a little bit different. I did not like being in the kitchen but being in the garden. I just wanted to give you background why I am tough, why am I fearless, why I do not care about what other people think about me,” said Semenya.

She, however, continued to . soccer at school and her skills were so good that some did not believe she was a girl.

“They started questioning, are you really a girl? One day, I walked naked in the changing room [to prove to them],” Semenya said.

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Erasmus believes planning, execution and luck can win the World Cup – Lifestyle News

South Africa coach Rassie Erasmus

JOHANNESBURG – South Africa coach Rassie Erasmus believes his side’s fate at the Rugby World Cup in Japan could be decided by fine margins such as the bounce of a ball, a missed tackle or a refereing decision.

Erasmus told Reuters in an interview that the team’s preparations, which included lifting the Rugby Championship for the first time in a decade, have been perfect, and they can have no excuse for not performing in Japan.

Erasmus believes they are not favourites for the trophy though, but says the gap between the leading nations has closed over the last 12 months.

“If you go purely on world rankings, we are still hovering between four and five, so that says we are not favourites. But I think the gap between team one and five in the world has shrunk,” Erasmus said.

“We are in with a much better chance than 18 months ago. I wouldn’t tag us as favourites, but we have a much more realistic chance.”

Erasmus believes he can find the right formula to win, but says the .ers must . their part too. The team will also need some good fortune if they are to claim a third World Cup title after previous successes in 1995 and 2007.

“My job is to coach well and the .ers’ job is to . well. We do have the talent and we have worked really hard,” he said.

“That is ultimately what we will be judged on. If we are lucky and we don’t get a lot of injuries, we should go deep in the tournament. And then it could be a referee’s decision, a bounce of a ball or a missed tackle.”

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‘GOOD POSITION’

Erasmus’s preparations have included sending an advanced party of .ers to New Zealand a week early during the Rugby Championship and resting 18 of his top .ers for their most recent 24-18 warm-up win over Argentina earlier this month.

“We feel we are fit and fairly injury-free at this stage. We certainly feel we are in a good space, but when we get onto that plane all the past games from this year count for nothing,” he said.

“All the preparation we have done so far has put us in a good position, we can’t look at any excuses that we had hiccups in preparation, bad injuries or logistical challenges, so if things don’t go our way, we can only point fingers at ourselves.”

He says the selection of captain Siya Kolisi is key after the flank missed much of the international season with a knee injury but was able to prove his fitness in the win over Argentina.

Kolisi, the first black test captain of the Boks, is a vital component of the side on and off the pitch, according to Erasmus, who acknowledges the need to broaden the game’s appeal to young black .ers in South Africa.

“When I appointed him captain last year, I did not know he would bring so much to the team off the field,” Erasmus said.

“I usually appoint captains for what they bring on the field, not off it, but my eyes weren’t open to what it meant for people around the country.

“He is doing a wonderful job. In the beginning he was struggling with that (captaincy), I think the first three, four games he .ed he suffered a bit.

“But perhaps I did not manage him too well in that period, he had to come through that and he has. He is really maturing and the way he carries himself is amazing.”

The Boks open their campaign against defending champions New Zealand in Yokohama on Sept. 21 before further group games against Namibia, Italy and Canada.

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Sport

Erasmus believes planning, execution and luck can win the World Cup – Lifestyle News

South Africa coach Rassie Erasmus

JOHANNESBURG – South Africa coach Rassie Erasmus believes his side’s fate at the Rugby World Cup in Japan could be decided by fine margins such as the bounce of a ball, a missed tackle or a refereing decision.

Erasmus told Reuters in an interview that the team’s preparations, which included lifting the Rugby Championship for the first time in a decade, have been perfect, and they can have no excuse for not performing in Japan.

Erasmus believes they are not favourites for the trophy though, but says the gap between the leading nations has closed over the last 12 months.

“If you go purely on world rankings, we are still hovering between four and five, so that says we are not favourites. But I think the gap between team one and five in the world has shrunk,” Erasmus said.

“We are in with a much better chance than 18 months ago. I wouldn’t tag us as favourites, but we have a much more realistic chance.”

Erasmus believes he can find the right formula to win, but says the .ers must . their part too. The team will also need some good fortune if they are to claim a third World Cup title after previous successes in 1995 and 2007.

“My job is to coach well and the .ers’ job is to . well. We do have the talent and we have worked really hard,” he said.

“That is ultimately what we will be judged on. If we are lucky and we don’t get a lot of injuries, we should go deep in the tournament. And then it could be a referee’s decision, a bounce of a ball or a missed tackle.”

ADVERTISEMENT

‘GOOD POSITION’

Erasmus’s preparations have included sending an advanced party of .ers to New Zealand a week early during the Rugby Championship and resting 18 of his top .ers for their most recent 24-18 warm-up win over Argentina earlier this month.

“We feel we are fit and fairly injury-free at this stage. We certainly feel we are in a good space, but when we get onto that plane all the past games from this year count for nothing,” he said.

“All the preparation we have done so far has put us in a good position, we can’t look at any excuses that we had hiccups in preparation, bad injuries or logistical challenges, so if things don’t go our way, we can only point fingers at ourselves.”

He says the selection of captain Siya Kolisi is key after the flank missed much of the international season with a knee injury but was able to prove his fitness in the win over Argentina.

Kolisi, the first black test captain of the Boks, is a vital component of the side on and off the pitch, according to Erasmus, who acknowledges the need to broaden the game’s appeal to young black .ers in South Africa.

“When I appointed him captain last year, I did not know he would bring so much to the team off the field,” Erasmus said.

“I usually appoint captains for what they bring on the field, not off it, but my eyes weren’t open to what it meant for people around the country.

“He is doing a wonderful job. In the beginning he was struggling with that (captaincy), I think the first three, four games he .ed he suffered a bit.

“But perhaps I did not manage him too well in that period, he had to come through that and he has. He is really maturing and the way he carries himself is amazing.”

The Boks open their campaign against defending champions New Zealand in Yokohama on Sept. 21 before further group games against Namibia, Italy and Canada.

Continue Reading

Sport

Erasmus believes planning, execution and luck can win the World Cup – Lifestyle News

South Africa coach Rassie Erasmus

JOHANNESBURG – South Africa coach Rassie Erasmus believes his side’s fate at the Rugby World Cup in Japan could be decided by fine margins such as the bounce of a ball, a missed tackle or a refereing decision.

Erasmus told Reuters in an interview that the team’s preparations, which included lifting the Rugby Championship for the first time in a decade, have been perfect, and they can have no excuse for not performing in Japan.

Erasmus believes they are not favourites for the trophy though, but says the gap between the leading nations has closed over the last 12 months.

“If you go purely on world rankings, we are still hovering between four and five, so that says we are not favourites. But I think the gap between team one and five in the world has shrunk,” Erasmus said.

“We are in with a much better chance than 18 months ago. I wouldn’t tag us as favourites, but we have a much more realistic chance.”

Erasmus believes he can find the right formula to win, but says the .ers must . their part too. The team will also need some good fortune if they are to claim a third World Cup title after previous successes in 1995 and 2007.

“My job is to coach well and the .ers’ job is to . well. We do have the talent and we have worked really hard,” he said.

“That is ultimately what we will be judged on. If we are lucky and we don’t get a lot of injuries, we should go deep in the tournament. And then it could be a referee’s decision, a bounce of a ball or a missed tackle.”

ADVERTISEMENT

‘GOOD POSITION’

Erasmus’s preparations have included sending an advanced party of .ers to New Zealand a week early during the Rugby Championship and resting 18 of his top .ers for their most recent 24-18 warm-up win over Argentina earlier this month.

“We feel we are fit and fairly injury-free at this stage. We certainly feel we are in a good space, but when we get onto that plane all the past games from this year count for nothing,” he said.

“All the preparation we have done so far has put us in a good position, we can’t look at any excuses that we had hiccups in preparation, bad injuries or logistical challenges, so if things don’t go our way, we can only point fingers at ourselves.”

He says the selection of captain Siya Kolisi is key after the flank missed much of the international season with a knee injury but was able to prove his fitness in the win over Argentina.

Kolisi, the first black test captain of the Boks, is a vital component of the side on and off the pitch, according to Erasmus, who acknowledges the need to broaden the game’s appeal to young black .ers in South Africa.

“When I appointed him captain last year, I did not know he would bring so much to the team off the field,” Erasmus said.

“I usually appoint captains for what they bring on the field, not off it, but my eyes weren’t open to what it meant for people around the country.

“He is doing a wonderful job. In the beginning he was struggling with that (captaincy), I think the first three, four games he .ed he suffered a bit.

“But perhaps I did not manage him too well in that period, he had to come through that and he has. He is really maturing and the way he carries himself is amazing.”

The Boks open their campaign against defending champions New Zealand in Yokohama on Sept. 21 before further group games against Namibia, Italy and Canada.

Continue Reading
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