Whether they’re into vanilla, rocky road, or mint chocolate chip, most Americans love Ice cream. But have you ever wondered if there’s more to this delicious dessert? Even if you’ve eaten ice cream every day of your life, you likely don’t know everything about it. The untold truth of ice cream include tales of American presidents, a cone that could hold enough ice cream to feed over 10,000 people, and even (weirdly), oysters.

We eat a lot of ice cream

I consider ice cream one of my guilty pleasures, so learning that the average American eats 22 pounds of ice cream a year made me breathe a sigh of relief. Now I can indulge with the knowledge that my fellow Americans are also scarfing down this delicious dessert with abandon.

The International Dairy Foods Association reported that “U.S. ice cream companies made more than 872 million gallons of ice cream in 2014.” Unsurprisingly, the summer months are the most popular time for eating ice cream and more ice cream is produced in June than in any other month. In 2012, based on credit card transactions, D.C. ate the most ice cream of any state in the US.

Ice cream cones were born out of despiration

In the early 1900s, two unrelated immigrants to America — one Italian and one Syrian — “invented” the ice cream cone a year apart from each other. An Italian named Italo Marchiony, who had immigrated to the US in the late 1800s, was granted an ice cream cone patent in 1903. But that’s not when ice cream cones really took off.

At the St. Louis World’s Fair, a Syrian named Ernest A. Hamwi was selling zalabis, essentially Syrian waffle treats, when the ice cream seller next to him ran out of dishes. In true entrepreneurial fashion, Hamwi shaped one of his zalabis into a cone and gave it to the ice cream seller. The ice cream seller’s predicament became Hamwi’s success, and ice cream cones were finally on the map.

Hamwi went on to open the Missouri Cone Company and in the 1950s, The International Association of Ice Cream Manufacturers named him the inventor of the ice cream cone. Other accounts attribute the ice cream cone to different inventors, but one thing’s for sure — the St. Louis World Fair did spread the popularity of the cones.

Ice cream sundaes were originally only sold on Sundays

Much like the origin story of ice cream cones, there are multiple accounts of the first ice cream sundaes. All accounts agree on one thing, though — the name ice cream sundae started because they were served on Sundays. In one version of the origin story, a law passed in 1890 prevented the sale of soda water on Sundays in Evanston, Illinois. In response, the soda fountains began selling ice cream sodas without the soda —essentially, ice cream sundaes.

The second version takes place in 1881 in Two Rivers, Wisconsin, when George Hallauer asked soda fountain owner Ed Berners if he would add chocolate syrup to his ice cream. Berner then added it to his regular menu. George Giffy, the owner of the ice cream shop in a nearby town, decided to serve the same thing to his customers, and he only sold it on Sundays.

In the third version, Chester Platt, a drugstore owner in Ithaca, New York, served Reverend John Scott vanilla ice cream with chocolate syrup and a candied cherry on (you guessed it) Sundays.

Ice cream sundaes were originally only sold on Sundays

Much like the origin story of ice cream cones, there are multiple accounts of the first ice cream sundaes. All accounts agree on one thing, though — the name ice cream sundae started because they were served on Sundays. In one version of the origin story, a law passed in 1890 prevented the sale of soda water on Sundays in Evanston, Illinois. In response, the soda fountains began selling ice cream sodas without the soda —essentially, ice cream sundaes.

The second version takes place in 1881 in Two Rivers, Wisconsin, when George Hallauer asked soda fountain owner Ed Berners if he would add chocolate syrup to his ice cream. Berner then added it to his regular menu. George Giffy, the owner of the ice cream shop in a nearby town, decided to serve the same thing to his customers, and he only sold it on Sundays.

In the third version, Chester Platt, a drugstore owner in Ithaca, New York, served Reverend John Scott vanilla ice cream with chocolate syrup and a candied cherry on (you guessed it) Sundays.

There’s a cure for ice cream headaches

You know that painful brain freeze you get when you eat your ice cream too quickly? Well, Dr. Jorge Serrador, a cardiovascular electronics researcher, actually did a medical study to find out how to cure it. He recruited 13 healthy adult volunteers, had them sip ice cold water, and then monitored the blood flow to their brains.

What they found out is that essentially, your brain tries to protect itself from the change in temperature . flooding blood into the  area. If you want to get rid of your ice cream headache, just warm up your palate . drinking warm water or putting your tongue up to your palate.

Apparently, ice cream headaches do have a purpose, and it’s not just to get you to eat your ice cream more slowly!

Ice cream can kill you (literally)

Unfortunately, ice cream stories don’t all have a sweet ending. According to Country Living, before milk was pasteurized in the late 1800s, ice cream poisonings were a common occurrence. “Newspapers described ice cream poisoning epidemics in which dozens of fair-goers, picnic attendees, and party guests were stricken or killed.”

Luckily, ice cream epidemics aren’t common today, but they’re not gone completely. From January 2010 to January 2015, ten cases of listeria infection broke out in four different states. Three of the patients, all living in Kansas, died of their illnesses. For a long time, no one could figure out where the listeria was coming from. That is, until a team from the South Carolina Department of Health linked the listeria cases with Blue Bell ice cream. Blue Bell later recalled all of its products in Texas and Oklahoma — the states where their factories had been linked to the outbreaks

.: Mashed