Connect with us

Relationship Tips

Woman marries Jamaican toyboy half her age who romanced her on Skype – and she got pregnant the first time they met

Screen Shot 2015-09-24 at 09.43.21

After an online romance Angharad Lovering, 38, from South Wales, flew to the Caribbean for a three-week holiday to meet Loric Bullock, then 19,and says she knew it was ‘meant to be’ when she came back pregnant. Her new lover then proposed by text and despite having only met him once she accepted. In October 2013 she gave birth to their baby boy, Tyrese – with a doctor holding her hand and Loric 5,000 miles away on the end of the phone.

Untitled-2

It was not until March 2014, when Tyrese was five months old, that Loric got his visa thanks to her £3,000 loan and could fly to the UK to meet his son for the first time – and his fiancé for the second – before marrying in the May. The couple now live together in Cardiff with their son, now one, and Angharad’s daughter from a previous relationship, Daisy, 15.
1

Ms Lovering admits that people often mistake Loric for for her son or her teenage daughter’s boyfriend.

She said: ‘A lot of people confuse him for her boyfriend. I don’t look as old as I am and I certainly don’t dress my age because I don’t want to look my age. I don’t have wrinkles so I’m lucky. But Loric has a baby face. A couple of people have said to my daughter, “Is that your boyfriend?” and she has to say, “No, it’s my stepfather.”

‘I keep a very small circle of friends and I don’t really get on with my family so I don’t give a damn what they think.’

Angharad and Loric, now 22, first started talking when she took Daisy – whose father is Jamaican – over to the country to meet her grandparents in 2012.

‘While I was there I met some guy and through that I got talking to Loric on Blackberry Messenger,’ said Angharad. “I didn’t think anything would come of it because he was really young – he looked about 12 in his picture.He looked like a baby, but we just kept chatting and got on really well.’
When Angharad got back to the UK, she and Loric embarked on transatlantic courtship over Skype, texts and voice messages.

2CAB32C200000578-3246057-Family_The_couple_now_live_together_in_Cardiff_with_their_son_Ty-a-43_1443009997167

Six months later Angharad went on a three-week holiday to Portmore, Jamaica, so that they could finally meet in real life.

‘I was desperate to go and meet him,’ she said. ‘We spent almost three weeks and we just had a lot of fun.

‘I thought he would just be nice to chat to but we completely fell for each other. We got on really well and then he said ‘I love you’.

‘When I got home and found out I was pregnant we saw it as a sign that we were meant to be.’
‘All we had had was three amazing weeks together and a million phone calls, but actually we didn’t really know each other at all,’ said Angharad.

‘When he finally got here, he became a father and we had no time together. Our whirlwind romance was now a reality.

‘We didn’t realise how much we didn’t know about each other and we were tiptoeing around each other, but then we started getting to know one another as a family.’

Source: UK Daily Mail

Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Relationship Tips

Here is an explanation for why communication dies slowly between a couple

Stonewalling in a relationship is what happens when one [or both] partners consciously and intentionally refuse to allow communication flow especially when there is something that really needs to be talked about.

Obviously, even when there aren’t issue or problems to deal with, the communication line between partners is meant to stay on at all times. Being able to talk to a partner; being able to express one’s deepest fears and even dumbest thoughts is one great thing about having a partner.


This is what stonewalling looks like – a partner trying to make things good, another refusing to listen.

But all that is put on hold with stonewalling.

Stonewalling is actually a form of communication deficiency, and differs greatly from the occasional timeout to calm down or collect your thoughts, which partners normally have every now and then.

It is an absolute refusal to consider your partner’s perspective. If you listen at all, you do it dismissively or contemptuously. It is a failure to practice the kind of communication skill required to keep your relationship going; and men have been accused of being main culprits of this.

According the result of a research carried out by Prof. John M. Gottman, a world-renowned psychologist, stonewalling “ is far more likely to be a male thing.”

“When women stonewall, it’s typically a function of temperament – they’re , inhibited, or . More commonly, it’s a learned behavior – engaging in conflict or emotion-laden conversation has exposed them to put-downs or abuse in the past.”

ALSO READ: 5 reassurances your girlfriend needs to hear regularly

And more interestingly, men do not even know when they do this. When their partners try to initiate conversations about certain important issues that affect them, they run or continuously push such discussions of dismiss them altogether.


Men are more guilty of stonewalling than women could ever be [Credit – LifeStyle.ng]

One of the signs that a man could be stonewalling is if he believes his partner nags him.

Women don’t necessarily nag all the time. When a partner keeps repeating something, it’s because she’s not being heard. A nagging partner is usually an unheard partner.

Whether it is practiced by a man or woman, stonewalling hurts your partner, and causes feelings of isolation, frustration, anger and could make them think that you don’t care about them or their opinions.’

There is only one solution to this malaise; intentional, effective communication.

Whether you have a spouse, bae, boo or you’re about to get one of these, stonewalling has no place in your relationship because great relationships thrive on communication not on negative actions as this.

Continue Reading

Relationship Tips

Here is an explanation for why communication dies slowly between a couple

Stonewalling in a relationship is what happens when one [or both] partners consciously and intentionally refuse to allow communication flow especially when there is something that really needs to be talked about.

Obviously, even when there aren’t issue or problems to deal with, the communication line between partners is meant to stay on at all times. Being able to talk to a partner; being able to express one’s deepest fears and even dumbest thoughts is one great thing about having a partner.


This is what stonewalling looks like – a partner trying to make things good, another refusing to listen.

But all that is put on hold with stonewalling.

Stonewalling is actually a form of communication deficiency, and differs greatly from the occasional timeout to calm down or collect your thoughts, which partners normally have every now and then.

It is an absolute refusal to consider your partner’s perspective. If you listen at all, you do it dismissively or contemptuously. It is a failure to practice the kind of communication skill required to keep your relationship going; and men have been accused of being main culprits of this.

According the result of a research carried out by Prof. John M. Gottman, a world-renowned psychologist, stonewalling “ is far more likely to be a male thing.”

“When women stonewall, it’s typically a function of temperament – they’re , inhibited, or . More commonly, it’s a learned behavior – engaging in conflict or emotion-laden conversation has exposed them to put-downs or abuse in the past.”

ALSO READ: 5 reassurances your girlfriend needs to hear regularly

And more interestingly, men do not even know when they do this. When their partners try to initiate conversations about certain important issues that affect them, they run or continuously push such discussions of dismiss them altogether.


Men are more guilty of stonewalling than women could ever be [Credit – LifeStyle.ng]

One of the signs that a man could be stonewalling is if he believes his partner nags him.

Women don’t necessarily nag all the time. When a partner keeps repeating something, it’s because she’s not being heard. A nagging partner is usually an unheard partner.

Whether it is practiced by a man or woman, stonewalling hurts your partner, and causes feelings of isolation, frustration, anger and could make them think that you don’t care about them or their opinions.’

There is only one solution to this malaise; intentional, effective communication.

Whether you have a spouse, bae, boo or you’re about to get one of these, stonewalling has no place in your relationship because great relationships thrive on communication not on negative actions as this.

Continue Reading

Relationship Tips

Here is an explanation for why communication dies slowly between a couple

Stonewalling in a relationship is what happens when one [or both] partners consciously and intentionally refuse to allow communication flow especially when there is something that really needs to be talked about.

Obviously, even when there aren’t issue or problems to deal with, the communication line between partners is meant to stay on at all times. Being able to talk to a partner; being able to express one’s deepest fears and even dumbest thoughts is one great thing about having a partner.


This is what stonewalling looks like – a partner trying to make things good, another refusing to listen.

But all that is put on hold with stonewalling.

Stonewalling is actually a form of communication deficiency, and differs greatly from the occasional timeout to calm down or collect your thoughts, which partners normally have every now and then.

It is an absolute refusal to consider your partner’s perspective. If you listen at all, you do it dismissively or contemptuously. It is a failure to practice the kind of communication skill required to keep your relationship going; and men have been accused of being main culprits of this.

According the result of a research carried out by Prof. John M. Gottman, a world-renowned psychologist, stonewalling “ is far more likely to be a male thing.”

“When women stonewall, it’s typically a function of temperament – they’re , inhibited, or . More commonly, it’s a learned behavior – engaging in conflict or emotion-laden conversation has exposed them to put-downs or abuse in the past.”

ALSO READ: 5 reassurances your girlfriend needs to hear regularly

And more interestingly, men do not even know when they do this. When their partners try to initiate conversations about certain important issues that affect them, they run or continuously push such discussions of dismiss them altogether.


Men are more guilty of stonewalling than women could ever be [Credit – LifeStyle.ng]

One of the signs that a man could be stonewalling is if he believes his partner nags him.

Women don’t necessarily nag all the time. When a partner keeps repeating something, it’s because she’s not being heard. A nagging partner is usually an unheard partner.

Whether it is practiced by a man or woman, stonewalling hurts your partner, and causes feelings of isolation, frustration, anger and could make them think that you don’t care about them or their opinions.’

There is only one solution to this malaise; intentional, effective communication.

Whether you have a spouse, bae, boo or you’re about to get one of these, stonewalling has no place in your relationship because great relationships thrive on communication not on negative actions as this.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Advertisement

Trending